AMIGUARD™ RPE Applied to IND Airport Economy Lot

Rapid penetrating emulsions (RPE) fill asphalt pavement voids and reduce air and water intrusion in pavements. Asphalt Materials Inc.’s (AMI) AMIGUARD™ RPE is specially formulated to penetrate pavement quickly and thoroughly. The penetrating nature of RPE means asphalt residue gets “in” the pavement rather than “on” the pavement, and the emulsion’s reduced surface tension allows it to seep into the pavement voids quickly. Proactively reducing pavement permeability extends pavement life.  

The AMI team worked with the Indianapolis Airport Authority (IAA) to support an RPE application on the Indianapolis International Airport’s (IND) Economy Parking Lot.  

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Central Kentucky Regional Airport Project Makes Kentucky 24th State to Use VRAM

The first void reducing asphalt membrane (VRAM) project was completed in the state of Kentucky, marking 24 states and the District of Columbia that use VRAM to save infrastructure funds. VRAM is applied at the location of the longitudinal joint prior to paving to fill a portion of the voids. This greatly reduces permeability and protects the joint area, resulting in longer pavement life.  

This project was completed on July 28, 2023, at the Central Kentucky Regional Airport in Madison County, Kentucky. 

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MnDOT finds PMBs Extend Road Service Life by Six Years

Many highway agencies recognize the benefits of using modified asphalts to reduce pavement distress and increase service life. A recent study from the Minnesota Department of Transportation (MnDOT) found that asphalt pavements with polymer-modified binders (PMBs) perform better than pavements with unmodified asphalt binders. They also found that modified binders are more cost-effective, even for local low-volume roads. While pavements with PMBs may cost more initially, performance is improved in the long run. 

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18-Month Project Review Shows VRAM Significantly Reduces Permeability

After beginning in the Midwest in 2002, VRAM has now been used in 23 states and The District of Columbia. VRAM stands for Void-Reducing Asphalt Membrane. Pavement maintenance due to longitudinal joint cracking has long been a problem for not only road construction engineers and applicators but also drivers. VRAM fills air voids and significantly reduces permeability at the longitudinal joint and the area on each side of the joint.

Recently, West Virginia’s Division of Highways (WVDOH) has encountered the issue of high permeability at the longitudinal joint and subsequent failure of their asphalt pavements. Longitudinal joint issues can arise when hot and cold lanes fail to adequately bond with one another. WVDOH is responsible for constructing, reconstructing, and maintaining more than 35,000 miles of state roads. So, it is evident that the issue of high permeability can create big, expensive problems for their division of highways and taxpayers.

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Comparative LCA of VRAM Highlighted at TRB 2023 Annual Meeting

Washington, D.C.2023 Transportation Research Board Annual Meeting

The Transportation Research Board (TRB) Annual Meeting was held in Washington, D.C. earlier this year. This year’s theme was Rejuvenation Out of Disruption: Envisioning a Transportation System for a Dynamic Future. The meeting included exhibitors from academia, industry, and government agencies presenting the latest research findings, technical developments, and implementation efforts within the asphalt industry. 

Asphalt Materials and HRG Labs had the unique opportunity to present two different posters at this year’s Transportation Research Board (TRB) Annual Meeting in early January.

Impact of Rumble Strips on Longitudinal Joint Pavement Performance

Comparative Life Cycle Assessment of a Void Reducing Asphalt Membrane
and Other Longitudinal Joint Treatments

In 2021, ClimeCo collaborated with Asphalt Materials, Inc. (AMI) to complete an LCA-based sustainability assessment of J-Band®, AMI’s void reducing asphalt membrane (VRAM) product. Together, ClimeCo and AMI wrote and presented their paper and poster titled, “Comparative Life Cycle Assessment of a Void Reducing Asphalt Membrane and Other Longitudinal Joint Treatments” at this year’s TRB Annual Meeting.

Caroline Kelleher of ClimeCo explains the sustainability benefits of VRAM.

Caroline Kelleher and Gary Yoder from ClimeCo, Gerry Huber of HRG, and Todd Thomas from AMI are the paper’s authors. During the meeting, many attendees came by to learn more about the three sustainability attributes of J-Band: environmental, economic, and social (safety).

Caroline Kelleher of ClimeCo and Todd Thomas of AMI attended the 2023 TRB Annual Meeting.

Important conclusions of this paper include the following:

  • There is significant potential to develop transportation infrastructure in line with the principles of sustainable development
  • Sustainability is an increasingly important component of transportation infrastructure, with federal, regional, and state entities having a range of awareness and education programs, all while promoting the use of ‘green’ or sustainable roadway products.
  • Upstream emissions associated with materials production are outside the carbon accounting of direct emissions, i.e., scope three instead of scope one emissions, and thus, as agencies and contractors look to reduce their scope one emissions, they will be evaluating methods and materials which will allow for a reduction in fuel usage.
  • Longitudinal joint solutions that offer the lowest application-phase emissions, reduced maintenance needs, and extended road lifetimes, will result in the lowest scope one emissions. In this analysis, VRAM and joint adhesive have the lowest construction phase emissions.
  • VRAM had the most economical life cycle cost performance compared to conventional joints and maintenance.

To read this paper, poster, other studies, and educational items about VRAM and J-Band, click the Resources link below.

Sustainability is very important to Asphalt Materials, Heritage Construction + Materials, and The Heritage Group. There are three pillars of sustainability: Economic. Environmental. Social/Safety.

Understanding Sustainability, LCAs, Cradle-to-Grave . . . and More!

There are many sources that use 3 pillars to help explain sustainability. But, explaining the three pillars of sustainability first requires defining sustainability. The concept of sustainability arose from environmental activism. It’s taken to mean making sure that the current generation can meet its needs without making it impossible for future generations to meet theirs. That is, we can sustain ourselves and posterity only with practices that do no future harm.1

We often hear talk about social sustainability, economic sustainability, and environmental sustainability. If we think of sustainability as the roof of a building that protects its occupants, we see that it takes all three pillars to hold it up. Sometimes people summarize them with the words people, profit, and planet. Weakness in any one pillar puts the roof in danger of collapsing. 1

Although the phrase “three pillars of sustainability” is common, one of the most helpful descriptions explains how they relate to each other via a Venn diagram. It comes closer to the related term “three spheres of sustainability.” In either case, no one of them can function optimally without both of the others as shown below.1

A Life Cycle Assessment
A Life Cycle Assessment (LCA), offers a framework for quantifying the potential environmental impacts of a product from cradle–to–grave (i.e., from growth/extraction of raw material inputs all the way through a product’s disposal), allowing us to make that determination. One of the many applications of an LCA is its ability to demonstrate the environmental benefits achieved by adopting different operational practices.

In February 2022, Gary Yoder and Jaskaran Sidhu wrote a story titled ‘What is a Life Cycle Assessment?’ This informative article highlights important information such as:

  • A Product’s Competitive Edge: Performance and Cost
  • Benefits of Product vs. Alternatives
  • Quantified GHGs and criteria air pollutants (AQ)
  • Using LCAs for a More Sustainable Future

To read the entire article, follow the link below:

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Rumble Strips Can Help Save Lives

Impact of Rumble Strips on Longitudinal Joint Pavement Performance

Rumble Strips Can Help Save Lives

The Transportation Research Board (TRB) Annual Meeting was held in Washington, D.C. in early January. This year’s theme was Rejuvenation Out of Disruption: Envisioning a Transportation System for a Dynamic Future. The meeting included exhibitors from academia, industry, and government agencies presenting the latest research findings, technical developments, and implementation efforts within the asphalt industry. 

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New Jersey CAIT Evaluates Performance of J-BAND® a Void Reducing Asphalt Membrane


On September 22, 2022, a Void Reducing Asphalt Membrane (VRAM) project was completed on the Pennsylvania Turnpike in Pennsylvania. This was a Center for Advanced Infrastructure and Transportation (CAIT) project. Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, is one of America’s leading public research universities and had joined with CAIT on this project.

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